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It’s flu season! So what does that mean for you and your family? It’s time to get vaccinated and protect not only yourself, but those around you from getting influenza (more commonly known as the flu). Influence Nevada is here to answer your flu vaccination questions, provide the most up-to-date information about what’s happening this flu season, where to get immunizations and offer resources to help keep you and your family healthy this flu season.

More times than not, people look at getting the flu as no big deal. Although it’s not exactly known how many people die each year from influenza, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that more than 23,000 people die each year from flu-related deaths – A number, which can be reduced if everyone receives the flu vaccination each year.

So who exactly should be vaccinated against the flu? Well the answer is simple really. Anyone over the age of 6-month should receive a flu vaccination each year. However, there is a list of people who are highly recommended, by the CDC, to receive an immunization.

1. Children- children are two-to-three times more likely to develop influenza since their immune systems are still developing. FluMist is now an available option for children over two. This is a nasal spray vaccination instead of a shot.

2. Pregnant women- It is highly recommended for pregnant women to get vaccinated. If you get any type of flu while pregnant you are more likely to have serious complications, such as pneumonia and preterm labor, which could put you and your baby at risk.

3. People 50 years of age and older- As we get older our immune system tends to weaken and it is much harder for our bodies’ natural defenses to combat viruses. Flu shots help boost immunity and now fluzone high dose is available for people over 65 years of age.

4. Anyone with certain chronic medical conditions- People with chronic medical conditions including, but not limited to, asthma, lung disease, heart disease, blood disorders, kidney disorders, weakened immune systems, and obesity are at high risk for developing flu complications.

5. People who live with or care for those at high risk for the flu- Since the flu is airborne and contagious, it’s important for those caring for people who are at high risk get vaccinated.

6. Healthcare workers- Working in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, or long-term care facilities, healthcare workers have a higher risk for contracting the flu.

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